Skip to main content

Boone County

  • Updated

Marshall farms with his wife and daughter’s family. They grow corn, soybeans, wheat and hay, and raise pastured turkeys for the Thanksgiving market. They have just started organic production o…

I know it’s fall when the cold water coming out of the barnyard hydrant feels warm to my hands on the last of these September mornings. Two of the last three mornings have been frosty, while the afternoons gradually work their way into the 60s. Clear and brisk is the story for the week, and …

The transition to fall is underway. Humid upper-80s gave way to crisp mid-40s. Downpours with golf-ball-sized hail gave way to beautiful cool, clear stretches over the last few days. The good news is tough old corn leaves aren’t as prone to hail damage as they were a few weeks back. I’m hopi…

On Sept. 11, the range of rainfall was 2-6 inches throughout the county, with 3.8 inches landing on our farm. That brought the drainage ditches and creeks to the top of their banks but not over the top. We are stretching our season out with these late-season rains. Our beans will be a good w…

Only .75 inches last week. Mornings are starting out in the 50s and fall colors are beginning to appear on a few soft wood trees. We are getting hints of what’s to come in the upcoming months. For the first time in forever, we have apples without blemishes. Without any effort on my part, the…

Last week the farm received another 1.75 inches. For August, most everyone in the county ended up with 10-14 inches in their gauges. With an average of an inch of rain every three days, we should have had a perfect scenario for any/every mold to take up shop on every acre of corn. We got not…

We experienced a perfect late-season week for putting our crop near its top potential. On Aug. 19, we had a 1-inch afternoon shower pass through and six days later, .6 inches landed during the night. In between was a stretch of sunshine and 80s. Pulling back husks, I find most varieties dent…

As much as I’d like to say it’s time to shut off the lawnmower, the reality is if everything is green and growing in my yard, there’s a good chance the same can be said for the field crops a few feet away. Mid-80s were the rule the last five days with sweatshirt temperatures prior to that at…

If you wanted to write a recipe for the final stretch of a corn growing season, you would stick a two-day, 4-5-inch rain event near the end of the first week in August. Most of the county fell into that scenario last weekend. We avoided the 12-16-inch dumps in neighboring counties to the wes…

As of Aug. 1, the wheat is finally out. With the intermittent showers over 10 days of harvest, I managed to drop the test weight by 4 pounds between the first and last loads. Three days later, the cover crop was no-tilled in and covered with a coat of manure. My landlord’s house is 50 feet o…

Three separate rain events last week put up to 2 inches of rain in everyone’s gauges. With temperatures in the low to mid-80s, and enough water to keep everything looking healthy in our neck of the woods, I think most everyone made it through pollination with a smile on their face. Planes ar…

On July 16, I had the opportunity to head south from the Wisconsin state line to New Holland in Logan County. Two things struck me about that stretch of our Prairie State: It’s beautiful and appears to be well watered. I don’t want to discount the work we all do and how that plays a part in …

There are changes occurring around the county that mark a general midpoint in the growing season. Combines are working through the ripened wheat fields and neighbors generally have smiles on their faces as yields have been really nice – 100 bushels is a number thrown about pretty easily this…

After a couple of weeks hoping to catch a break from the hot and dry, we finally got it. A slow-moving system parked over the county and now we find ourselves hoping for a little hot and dry. The range of rain in the county over that two-day event went from 3.5 to 7 inches. We topped off at …

A few soybean flowers are poking out as of June 29. That's right in line with the days starting to get shorter. The corn is growing, but I would suspect at a little slower rate than if it had all the moisture it wanted. A few weeks ago, I thought we were in the “favorably moist” column, but …

Last week, we were over 100 degrees once, and had our fair share of 90-degree weather. The crops are growing as they accumulate GDUs, but they are looking a little tough trying to defend against the afternoon heat. We are out of the fields for now and waiting for the wheat to ripen. That cro…